Stories

Identity, perceptions and economic repercussions of the Syrian crisis on Lebanon at the heart of the UNDP latest edition of the News Supplement
< Back to Stories

Identity, perceptions and economic repercussions of the Syrian crisis on Lebanon at the heart of the UNDP latest edition of the News Supplement

“I Hate You. A powerful statement and title of a 385-page study on hate speech and sectarianism in “Arab Spring” media. It is also a reflection of countless Arab world afflictions that was published in 2014 by the Amman-based Center for Defending Freedom of Journalists (CDFJ).”

That’s how also Magda Abu-Fadil, journalist, blogger and director of Media Unlimited started her article entitled “I hate you”, tackling this study, which was published in the 13th issue of the UNDP Peace Building in Lebanon News Supplement.

Funded by the German Ministry of Economic Cooperation and Development through KfW, this issue was published on the 30th of September 2016.

The Arabic version was distributed with Annahar and As-Safir newspapers while the English version was distributed with The Daily Star and the French one with L’Orient-Le Jour.

Lebanese and Syrian writers, human rights activists, artists, journalists, media professionals and researchers discussed civil peace issues in addition to topics related to displaced Syrians and the communities that host them. Participants in this venture have given particular attention to the emotional, humanitarian, and economic dimensions of the repercussions of the Syrian crisis on Lebanon.

This 13th issue of the supplement gave participants the opportunity to share their perceptions, fears and aspirations. “Over the past four years, I have said goodbye to a large number of friends who passed through Beirut on their way to Turkey where death boats awaited them! Who can blame them? Death and poverty have beset most of them, their homes have been destroyed, so they have preferred adventure at sea to staying in undignified displacement camps”, wrote Syrian novelist Lina Hwayan el Hassan.

Writers have also discussed the economic repercussions of the crisis on Lebanon and shared stories of Syrian farmers from the Bekaa.

A special focus was also made on the definition of identity, the role of media in peace building, the role of education in social cohesion and on the need for revising the discipline of history and depoliticizing it. “While we know that we have a long way to achieve our objective of revising the discipline of history and depoliticising it, we know a bottom up and collaborative approach with policy makers is going to make this journey shorter and more successful. For that we count on courageous history teachers and historians as well as policy makers who are willing to revisit decades of conventional thinking which have been stifling progress in this field”, concluded Dr. Bassel Dr Bassel Akar, Dr Maha Shuayb and Nayla Hamadeh, founding members of the Lebanese Association for History their article entitled: “Towards a disciplinary approach to History Education: the experience of the Lebanese Association for History (LAH)”

The supplement was uploaded on the UNDP Lebanon website (www.lb.undp.org/pbsupplement) and shared on all UNDP related social media platforms.